“Hallo, Rabbit,” he said, “is that you?”





“Hallo, Rabbit,” he said, “is that you?”
“Let’s pretend it isn’t,” said Rabbit, “and see what happens.” ― A.A. Milne



“Real isn’t how you are made,’ said the Skin Horse. ‘It’s a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real.’

‘Does it hurt?’ asked the Rabbit.

‘Sometimes,’ said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. ‘When you are Real you don’t mind being hurt.’

‘Does it happen all at once, like being wound up,’ he asked, ‘or bit by bit?’

‘It doesn’t happen all at once,’ said the Skin Horse. ‘You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.” ― Margery Williams



“It was much pleasanter at home,” thought poor Alice, “when one wasn’t always growing larger and smaller, and being ordered about by mice and rabbits. I almost wish I hadn’t gone down the rabbit-hole–and yet–and yet–…” ― Lewis Carroll


Just a moment of rabbit rabbit… without any rabbit rabbit from me.


6 thoughts on ““Hallo, Rabbit,” he said, “is that you?”

  1. I still have my copy of The Velveteen Rabbit.
    It’s interesting how so many of the abused and or bullied can relate so well to this book.
    For me it relates to having to pretend so much, never feeling safe to be real.


    1. Within a children’s story is often the safe place a child needs to retreat to from the harshness of the real world. Adults often do something similar with books and stories, but a child’s imagination is more potent because everything is always experienced more vividly. Fables offer a logical way for us to make sense of something illogical. It’s life wisdom in whimsical form, one of the best ways to learn things and to find strength within. So many children’s stories offer that, a way to find the strength within when those outside seem to be trying to steal it.

      I don’t own anything from my past except my memories of it, and those change as the present changes.

      It’s a beautiful story, deeply philosophical – how focused love can make things real. If you grew up without love you never quite feel safe enough to be real… unless you give to yourself what you need to be real perhaps.

      Thank you for sharing 🙂


      1. “unless you give to yourself what you need to be real perhaps”
        I’m doing this now. Had to cut off family ties to do it. Within the circumstances I felt the need to do it, I have not completely grieved it all, numbing a lot as a survival mechanism.

        I don’t even miss them most of the time, but every now and then a memory will trigger the sadness. I need some really hard cries, but they aren’t coming through. It’s frustrating, because I’m not using substances any longer to numb anything.


        1. Those really hard cries are wonderful, very deep inner massage and release of all that is held within, but they are rare especially if you’re used to stemming the flow and being stoic.

          Sometimes just knowing about the need to cry is enough, even if the tears don’t come, the acknowledgement of it is there.

          Take care of yourself and trust yourself 🙂


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