Learning to Figure Things Out for Yourself

There are moments in life when you may suddenly get the strong impression that you’re on your own, that you’re all alone…

in some impossible situation which you’re certain you can’t possibly solve on your own…

you need help, but…

there isn’t a knight in shining armor coming to your rescue, there isn’t going to be a hero who saves you from the situation you’re in, no one is there for you (even if you’re surrounded by people)…

those people who claim to be there for you… terms and conditions apply… even if they want to help, be your hero… this situation scares them, they can’t deal with it either, they don’t know how to help you and that makes them feel helpless, powerless… they don’t like feeling that way so they’re out of here one way or another…

you’re going to have to be there for yourself, save yourself, solve your problem on your own, be your own hero and knight in shining armor…

but…

you aren’t prepared for that…

perhaps because many of the stories you’ve read (or which have been read to you), the movies you’ve seen, the songs you’ve heard (sometimes played on repeat because you liked the same tale it was telling in each different song), has spoken of some hero (often an unlikely one) saving you (or your alter ego character in those stories, films, songs) at the last minute.

Someone else is always there for you, saving your day or your ass… so you don’t have to learn how to do it for yourself.

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the-beautiful-net-the-oa

from the Netflix series The OA

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How do these heroes which we read, hear, see about, become heroes?

The hero myth in fiction often comes with superpowers being discovered under duress – the hero doesn’t know they’re a hero until they have to save themselves or someone they love (or a stranger whom they care about because they’re humanity personified) from some dire circumstance.

Or a deity (or a group of special people) inform a person that they’re the chosen one – chosen to save the world…

Why does the world always need saving?

And why do the villains in these hero tales often ‘mistakenly’ think they’re the chosen ones who are saving the world?

And why does the hero often get mistaken as a villain… with maybe the villain being heralded as a hero?

And isn’t it strange that the hero and villain often have so much in common?

The hero in the latter scenario is usually too humble to accept that they’re the chosen one even if it’s a deity telling them so… they think the deity (or special people group) are wrong in their judgment, they reject the status they’ve been given… until they’re forced to accept it against their will due to extenuating circumstances which prove to them that they’re (forever screwed by being) the chosen one.

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unfair-choices-the-oa

from the Netflix series The OA

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Why do we like these tales so much that we keep writing about them, reading about them, making moving pictures of them, watching those moving pictures about them (turning them into blockbusters… thus setting up the stage for more to come, because they make money and anything that makes money due to being popular and hitting a popular chord keeps getting made), singing about them, and listening to songs about them?

Is it because we identify with them personally, and not just because we keep hoping that a hero will save us from a villain, but also because, deep down inside, we are that unlikely hero (even when everyone, a deity, a special group of people, ourselves, is telling us we’re the villain).

Is it because of those moments in life when you may suddenly get the strong impression that you’re on your own, that you’re all alone…

you had to be your own hero, you had to learn to figure things out for yourself…in your own time,at your own pace,to the beat of your own drum…a drum which makes a different sound depending on whether it is full, half full, half empty, empty…

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